Jin R. Lee to serve on National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine committee

Jin R. Lee to serve on National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine committee

Jin R. Lee, Assistant Professor in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society at George Mason University, has been appointed to serve on the Committee on Cybercrime Classification and Measurement by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM).

Under congressional mandate (as requested in the Better Cybercrime Metrics Act, P.L. 117-116), NASEM will conduct a consensus panel study to review current measurement and reporting of cybercrime, developing a taxonomy that can be used to measure cyber-enabled and cyber-dependent crimes experienced by individuals and businesses. This study will build on the Modernizing Crime Statistics consensus study (NASEM, 2016, 2018) and a study by the U.S. Government Accountability Office (2023). Further, the study report will provide conclusions and recommendations for a taxonomy that can be used by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) to measure cyber-enabled and cyber-dependent crimes in the National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS), the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS), or any successor systems. 

“This is a major honor and highly unusual, at least from my knowledge, for someone who is more junior,” noted Department Chair James Willis, when announcing Lee's appointment. 

Jin R. Lee received his Ph.D. in Criminal Justice from Michigan State University and was the 2022 recipient of the American Society of Criminology Division of Cybercrime Early Career Award. His work has examined various topics around cybercrime and cybersecurity, including law enforcement competencies and perceptions of online crime; computer hacking and the role of the Internet in facilitating all manner of crime and deviance; online illicit market behaviors; ideologically motivated cyberattacks; and online interpersonal violence offending and victimization. Lee is a research partner across various institutions, including George Mason University's Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy, Michigan State University's International Interdisciplinary Research Consortium on Cybercrime, Boston University's Center for Cybercrime Investigation and Cybersecurity, and the University of Ontario Institute of Technology's Digital Life Research Group.

“I am incredibly honored to be appointed by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine for this important project, and look forward to contributing to the task at hand,” Lee said. “As a cybercrime and cybersecurity scholar within criminology and criminal justice sciences, this project and appointment is especially humbling and meaningful.”